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Sarah Morris talks about her favorite broadcaster
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05/05/2002 10:00 pm ET 
Sarah Morris talks about her favorite broadcaster
By Sarah Morris / Dodgers.Com

"Vin Scully's eloquence and command of the English language is just amazing. I was shocked when I found out Scully does not know what he has said during a game." (Ben Platt/MLB.com)

When I am asked who my favorite Dodger is, I automatically say some player, but I should name Vin Scully.

I learned so much from Scully while I was growing up. He has taught me about baseball and life. Being a super role model, Scully has shown me how to handle what life brings me with class. He has always handled his job in a professional manner, which I try to duplicate.

While Scully educated me, he made it entertaining. He rarely repeats himself, so I must listen closely. This helped me to excel in college. Whereas most students are used to having the high school teachers repeat themselves three times, I was used to remembering what Scully said only once. Thus, I was prepared when college professors never repeated themselves.

Though most teachers would not view Scully as an educator, I do.

When the Dodgers moved from Brooklyn to Los Angeles in 1958, most citizens of Southern California had not had an opportunity to listen or watch in person a Major League game. Though television had a game of the week and the World Series was shown, television was still new, and not everyone had a set at home.

Scully had to educate the population of Los Angeles about baseball.

While teaching, Scully had to make the game interesting and entertaining. He never seems to be talking down to his audience. That helps our enjoyment of the games. He has a unique talent to make the explanations so simple that a child can understand them while keeping the most ardent baseball fan interested. I don't believe my grandparents had much knowledge of baseball when the Dodgers moved to Los Angeles, but until the time they died, they never missed a Dodger game if they could help it. To me, the popularity of the Dodgers in Los Angeles is directly connected with Vin Scully's skill.

Though Scully has been broadcasting Dodger games for fifty-three years, he does not seem bored with a game. When the Dodgers are involved in a blow out, he does not harp on how poor the play was on a certain team. He entertains his audience with anecdotes about baseball, history, literature, or American culture.

Scully dislikes working with a partner because he wants to talk directly to his audience. I am glad. When I must listen to a broadcasting team, I feel like I am eavesdropping on a private conversation. I dislike the jokes that are exchanged between the partners. I often find the game hard to follow and boring while the broadcasting team discusses something irrelevant to the game.

Scully is a valuable link between the cities that the Dodgers have called home. Scully is and has a real gift to relate the two organizations together. I would not know that Jackie Robinson performed better when angry if I had not listened to Scully. I learned that Duke Snider, who is in the Baseball Hall of Fame, had a bad knowledge of the strike zone when he was a young player. Without Scully, I, along with many Los Angeles Dodger fans, would not have much knowledge of the Brooklyn Dodgers.

I cannot believe how many historic baseball moments Scully has broadcasted. In 1951 as a young broadcaster, Scully witnessed "the shot heard around the world" (Bobby Thomson's dramatic home run that knocked the Dodgers out of the World Series). He broadcasted the first and only World Championship in Brooklyn in 1955. As a Los Angeles Dodger broadcaster, Scully has announced world championships in 1959, 1963, 1965, 1981, and 1988.

Scully has broadcasted no-hitters galore and two perfect games. He was lucky enough to see all four of Sandy Koufax's no-hitters, including his perfect game against the Chicago Cubs on September 9, 1965. He broadcasted Dennis Martinez's perfect game against the Dodgers in 1991.

During both Don Drysdale's and Orel Hershiser's scoreless innings streaks, Scully was in the booth describing the action. He helped to create Fernandomania and Nomomania.

Vin Scully's eloquence and command of the English language is just amazing. I was shocked when I found out Scully does not know what he has said during a game. I spend all week thinking about what I am going to write and how I should phrase it, and I don't have the eloquence or the clever phrasing that Scully has. Last Tuesday Scully described a player as a "slick article" introducing us to a phrase from his youth.

This eloquence and Scully's intelligence has earned him national recognition. In 1982 Scully was elected to the broadcasters' wing of the Baseball Hall of Fame. When the Dodgers were celebrating their one hundredth anniversary, the Dodgers ran a poll asking fans about their favorite Dodger. Vin Scully simply won the survey. When Major League Baseball chose an All Century Team, Scully was All Century Sportscaster.

On a personal note, I would like to thank Vin Scully for being my eyes and ears at Dodger games and teaching me the importance of preparation.

Sarah Morris is the editor of Dodger Place. She lives in Anderson, Texas.
 





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