LOS ANGELES -- Dodgers owner Frank McCourt said the Opening Day parking-lot incident that left a Giants fan hospitalized in critical but stable condition was a random act of violence.

"Everything from the result of the game to the overall experience was fantastic, and to have a few individuals mar that, it's a terrible thing," McCourt said at Saturday's dedication of a Dodgers Dream Field at Martin Luther King Jr. Recreation Field in Los Angeles.

"Any human being doing physical harm to another human being, just words can't describe how awful that is. That said, it happens. It's one of those awful things and I'm not making any excuses whatsoever ... but I'm quite confident that all of our measures were in place, and it's just one of those things that you could have 2,000 policemen there and it's just not going to change that random act of violence. It's a sad, sad thing."

McCourt, asked about a Los Angeles Police Department report that there were 72 arrests at Dodger Stadium on Opening Day, said he couldn't confirm the number.

"One arrest is too many as far as I'm concerned," he said. "Let's keep in mind that Opening Day is 56,000 people, it's a lot of people, and the incidents we had relative to that were very, very few. But that said, one is too many.

"What I'm very, very satisfied with is that the people in the organization work extremely hard to provide a safe environment for our fans, and any breach of that they take personally. It's very upsetting to them because their job is to make this the safest venue in sports and they work hard at it 24/7. They really, really take this stuff to heart and they work extremely hard to create the environment that we promise our fans."

Mattingly calls on reserves for day game

LOS ANGELES -- Three games into the season and Dodgers manager Don Mattingly penciled in a Saturday starting lineup with five bench players.

Mattingly already was planning to rest shortstop Rafael Furcal and catcher Rod Barajas for the day game following a night game, but the continued absence of Juan Uribe caused further juggling.

Uribe's triceps, bruised when drilled by a Tim Lincecum pitch on Opening Day, was reported improved. But after taking swings in the batting cage, it was decided he would miss his second consecutive start.

Aaron Miles again started for Uribe at third base, this time moved to Furcal's leadoff spot, and rookie Ivan De Jesus was back at second base, followed in the order by regulars Andre Ethier, Matt Kemp and James Loney.

The switch-hitting Hector Gimenez, with three Major League at-bats, was given the start at catcher batting sixth, followed by left fielder Xavier Paul and shortstop Jamey Carroll.

"[Furcal] was part of the regular plan," said Mattingly. "He wanted to play. If he gets today [off], he'll play tomorrow. There's two off-days [sandwiched around a two-game series in Colorado], then we feel we'll have him back for a stretch and rested."

Mattingly indicated he picked Gimenez over A.J. Ellis because of matchups, with the Giants starting right-hander Matt Cain.

Lopes leaves Dodgers after death in family

LOS ANGELES -- Dodgers first-base coach Davey Lopes, credited with the club's recent aggressiveness on the bases, has left the club following a death in the family.

Manager Don Mattingly said assistant hitting coach Dave Hansen will replace Lopes in the first-base coach's box.

Lopes, a second-base fixture in the Dodgers' record-breaking infield with Steve Garvey, Bill Russell and Ron Cey, returned to the club over the winter as part of Mattingly's rebuilt coaching staff after developing a cult following as a baserunning master instructor in Philadelphia.

Matt Kemp, who keyed the Dodgers' winning rally Friday night by going from first to third on an infield groundout, credited Lopes' instruction, as did Mattingly following that 4-3 win over the Giants.

The Dodgers are off Monday and Thursday, with a two-game series in Colorado on Tuesday and Wednesday. Lopes could miss those games, but the club is hopeful he would return in time for the Dodgers' series next weekend in San Diego, where Lopes makes his home.